Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘trees’

For the third year in a row, trees as green stormwater infrastructure will be the main topic at the Georgia Urban Forest Council summer program, August 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Norcross Community Center, 10 College Street. Karen Firehock, Executive Director of the Green Infrastructure Center in Charlottesville, Virginia, will kick off the program with a presentation on the valuable role of trees in stormwater management with some examples from Norcross and Alpharetta. The Green Infrastructure Center, Inc. (GIC) was formed in 2006 to help local governments, communities, and regional planning organizations, land trusts and developers evaluate their green infrastructure assets and make plans to conserve them. GreenBlue Urban, an international company that helps cities with integrating stormwater management into urban tree planting design, will also highlight their green infrastructure projects and tools. Christine McKay, Water Protection Division, US EPA Region 4, will facilitate a panel discussion of community leaders, arborists, landscape architects, and planners on challenges and successes in their communities regarding trees and stormwater management. Lunch is included. CEUs will be available. Register here.

Read Full Post »

great-american-tree-logo

Fall is the perfect time to appreciate trees, and The American Grove website has launched a competition to find 2016’s “Great American Tree.” Trees that have extraordinary color, a unique flower, feature or story are being sought for nomination, due no later than November 30.

The competition for national stand-out trees is in its second year at www.Americangrove.org. Submissions must include a photograph, a description of why the tree is special, its location, species, and size, including height and/or diameter. Nominations will be shared via social media, including Facebook (The Grove), Twitter (@plantyourlegacy; #greatamericantree), and Instagram (american_grove). Nominations may also be submitted as an email attachment to sgranbery@gfc.state.ga.us.

From December 1 – 9, after the submission period has ended, online American Grove members will be allowed one vote for a favorite entry per person. The top five vote winning trees will be placed in the national competition. An “all star” urban forestry panel will determine the winner of the 2016 Great American Tree, which will be announced on December 22, 2016. The first place winner will receive $500, second place is $250 and third place is $100. The winning tree will earn a feature on The American Grove homepage. The 2015 Great American Tree was ‘That Tree’ located in Platteville, Wisconsin.

The American Grove is an online community for sharing experiences and knowledge about trees and the benefits they provide to communities throughout the nation. It is managed by the Georgia Urban Forest Council, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to sustain Georgia’s green legacy by helping communities grow healthy trees. Assistance is also given by the Georgia Forestry Commission, which provides leadership, service and education in the protection and conservation of Georgia’s forest resources. Learn more at GaTrees.org.

Read Full Post »

From the Savannah Tree Foundation:

We are wishing everyone well in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.

We want to remind everyone as you continue to clean up and remove debris to please practice safety first when it comes to your trees. Click here to read more about STF’s storm safety tips.

Please keep in mind basic safety gear such as eye protection, closed toe shoes, and a hard hat.  And chaps for anyone using a chain saw.

Hiring an Arborist

Do you need to hire a certified arborist to evaluate the health of your trees? Click here for tips and recommendations on hiring a certified arborist to care for your trees.

You can verify the ISA credential of anyone claiming to be a certified arborist here:  http://www.isa-arbor.com/findanarborist/verify.aspx

With so many trees blown over by the hurricane winds, we encourage everyone to be thinking about their replanting plans for the upcoming winter planting season. Not sure about what tree to replant?

Check out the Savannah Tree Foundation Guide to Planting and Caring for Trees in Coastal GA.

Also, you can support the Savannah Tree Foundation’s community tree planting program by helping to fund future tree planting projects.

Donate a Tree Here

More Community Forestry Storm Response Resources from the Georgia Forestry Commission

 

Read Full Post »

North Georgia is experiencing a significant drought and that will have an impact on this year’s fall leaf season. Driving through the mountains you’ll notice some patches of brown, but color is beginning to show.

Northeast Georgia:

Cooler nights over the last week have helped jump start the fall color change. Dogwoods and sourwoods are showing various shades of red and burgundy, and the maples are turning to reds, burgundies and varying shades of yellow. We are also seeing some change in the birches with scattered lemon yellows. Yellow poplar is also showing shades of yellow, though we’re seeing many of these trees beginning to drop leaves.

Fall color normally starts at the higher elevations and progresses to lower elevations as we move through the season, so your best opportunity to see some of this early change is to travel Georgia’s highest elevation roads. Check out the Richard B. Russell Scenic Highway (GA 348) or the approach roads to Georgia’s highest point, Brasstown Bald (GA Highway 180 Spur).

Northwest Georgia:

The current drought has had a tighter grip on the northwest portion of the state, where we’re seeing some early leaf drop and some early change. Yellow poplars are starting to turn and drop leaves. Dogwoods and sourwoods are starting to show reds and burgundies.

The highest elevations of the region are the best places to catch a glimpse of the earliest changes in foliage, so the Cloudland Canyon and Lookout Mountain areas will be good bets for color.

Reminder! Because of the drought, fire danger is high! Be very careful if you’re having a campfire or cooking outdoors – and if  you do any outdoor  burning, be sure to get a burn permit from the Georgia Forestry Commission.

 

Read Full Post »

Here are some photos from the conference:

Do you take care of trees on a college or university campus? Don’t miss the

2016 GUFC College Canopy Conference, scheduled for September 14 (9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.) at Oxford College of Emory University in Oxford, Georgia. This historic college located at 110 Few Circle in Oxford, Georgia will host us as we hear talks on best management practices and campus management plans and choose from tours which include the Trees of the Oxford College Quad, Oxford’s famed Yarbrough Oak, and tree care on a construction project. This popular conference is a must for physical plant managers and crews, landscape directors, administrators, arborists, and others who are responsible for healthy campus urban forests.  Meet your peers from other educational institutions, share projects, and gain new urban forestry knowledge and ideas. $50 to register.  Lunch included.  5.5 ISA CEUs will be available.  See agenda here. Register here.

Read Full Post »

P1010208.JPG

This information is reposted from the Illinois Wood Utilization Team.

For the first time ever, the Urban Wood Movement will make its presence felt at the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta.

The Full Circle Urban Forestry Network, comprised of urban wood utilization groups in four states – Illinois, Michigan, Missouri and Wisconsin – is organizing a free 90-minute seminar, “Urban Wood Utilization: Making Wood Products and Profits from Landscape Trees.” The session is scheduled for 1:00 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26 at the Georgia World Congress Center.

Attendees of this free session will learn::

  • How to find sources of urban wood;
  • The unique source local/buy local marketing appeal of urban wood products and the interesting stories they tell;
  • The environmental advantages of utilizing urban wood;.
  • An opportunity to get answers to their questions posed to a panel of seasoned urban wood product experts.

Rich Christianson, communications director for the Illinois Wood Utilization Team and former long-time editor of Woodworking Network, will moderate a panel of three urban wood entrepreneurs. They will discuss their personal passions and experiences of creating products and profits by repurposing landscape and community trees felled by disease, storm damage, old age and other causes. Each of their presentations will shed light on opportunities to repurpose urban wood otherwise destined for the chipper or landfill to make high-quality lumber, slabs, furniture, flooring and other wood products.

Panelists include:

  • Jennifer Alger of Far West Forest Products of Sheridan, CA, helps market the family business that specializes in reclaimed wood including lumber the company mills from the area’s urban forest. Ninety percent of the lumber sold by the company comes from within a 500-mile radius of its Sheridan facility. Far West Forest Products also serves as a dealer for Wood-Mizer portable sawmills and blades and offers blade re-sharpening services.
  • Rick Siewert, who along with his wife, Cindy, owns Wood from the Hood of Minneapolis, MN. Wood from the Hood, which gives community trees a second life, is also Siewert’s second wood business. He is the owner of Siewert Cabinet & Fixture, a high-tech, 35-man architectural millwork company and has a long history of serving the Architectural Woodwork Institute, including sitting on the AWI Board of Directors and various committees. Siewert Cabinet is a past winner of the Woodworking Machinery Industry Association’s coveted Innovator of the Year Award. (When you visit Wood from the Hood’s website be sure to check out the video on live edge cribbage boards and flight paddles.)
  • Dwayne Sperber, owner of Wudeward Urban Forest Products of Milwaukee, WI, has always been interested in architecture, wood, and the environment. He was introduced to urban wood more than a decade ago, and with this intersect of his three passions, Sperber immediately became a major advocate for its use. He has worked tirelessly to build awareness and markets for the abundance of wood being removed due to insect, disease or other circumstance. Sperber is a founding partner of Wisconsin Urban Wood, a nonprofit focused on building networks of people and businesses that links material streams and availability of quality urban wood products and services across our state. He also is an appointed member of the Wisconsin Urban Forestry Council.

Note: While the seminar is being presented free of charge, advanced registration is required to guarantee a seat. Registration for the IWF Fair is $30. Learn more and register at IWAtlanta.com/Education/NBS6.

For information about becoming a seminar sponsor and general inquiries, contact Rich Christianson atrichc.illinoisurbanwood@gmail.com; 773-822-6750.

Wood-Mizer LLC of Indianapolis, IN, a manufacturer of portable sawmills, sawblades and other wood processing equipment and accessories, has signed on as a major sponsor of the program.

View Sponsorship Opportunities

About the International Woodworking Fair
The International Woodworking Fair, owned by the Woodworking Machinery Industry Association and the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is North America’s largest woodworking event. IWF 2016 is scheduled for August 24-27, 2016 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. It is the “must attend” show for supplies, manufacturing and processing of materials for the furniture, cabinetry, flooring, door and window, plastics, solid surfacing and machine tooling industries. IWF 2014 attracted more than 23,000 woodworking professionals and industry suppliers from the U.S., Canada and beyond. Learn more at iwfatlanta.com.

About the Full Circle Urban Forestry Network
The Full Circle Urban Forestry Network operates from funding provided by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern, State and Private Forestry Landscape Scale Restoration Grant Program. The four state partners include:

About the USDA Forest Service
The Full Circle Urban Forestry Network’s IWF urban wood seminar is made possible through grant funding by the Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry, U.S. Forest Service. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Read Full Post »

TheGroveLogoFinal

AmericanGrove.org is a social network of community tree and urban forestry advocates. The website, http://www.americangrove.org is managed by the nonprofit Georgia Urban Forest Council. The mission of the website is to be an online community for sharing tree-planting experiences and knowledge that will encourage others to create thriving community forests. AmericanGrove.org’s footprint exceeds over 4100 google-indexed pages. In its five year history, it has had over half a million page views. Its 4000- plus unique members are urban forestry advocates and tree enthusiasts, potentially growing any content on American Grove exponentially. American Grove also relies on its network of social media to both draw attention to tree content on the Grove as well as tree content from across the internet. The administrator of American Grove is at the hub of tree content production, curation, and propagation. The administrator also sets the tone and personality of American Grove though design, support, and choice of content.

The intern must be committed to working 5-8 hours per week.

This is a part-time internship and work can be done at home.  The intern will be paid over a two-semester period in monthly hourly payments at a rate of $15 per hour.

Interested candidates may send their resumes, a small writing sample, and contact information to marylynne@gufc.org until July 1.  Selected candidate will begin internship around August 1 or the beginning of their fall academic semester.

Qualifications:

This position requires that the intern:

Must be enrolled in undergrad or grad school and commit to the internship for 2 semesters.

Must have integrity in weekly progress reports and time sheets.

Must have excellent communication and writing skills, creativity, and a natural eye for good web layout. Candidates will be asked to submit a short writing sample.

Must love trees and the natural environment.

Contact:

Mary Lynne Beckley

Executive Director

Georgia Urban Forest Council

P.O. Box 2199

Stone Mountain, Georgia 30086

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »