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Posts Tagged ‘Georgia’

Hurricane Irma is poised to take its place in the history books, and cities across Georgia are expected to be faced with tons of debris – on roadways, in parks and cemeteries, and everything in between. Many trees will be lost, which can take months to clean up. Safety for everyone is the first concern, and only then can clean up be addressed. Here are some tips and resources.

Chainsaw Safety, Contracting and Clean-Up

Urban trees provide health, environmental, economic and aesthetic values to communities, businesses and homes. Trees that are not properly maintained or which are stressed can quickly become major liabilities to people and property during hurricanes.

Immediate responses may be either to prune or remove your trees. These “do-it-yourself” efforts sometimes result in personal injuries, fatalities or property damage that homeowners are attempting to avoid. You can cause greater harm to the urban forest by removing healthy trees that do not need to be cut. Click the link below to download the PDF. For hard copies, please contact jscales@gfc.state.ga.us.

Managing Storm Damaged Trees: Do’s and Dont’s

 

Need the Help of a Certified Arborist to Assess City Trees? Let Us Know

Our foresters will be monitoring local communities for storm damage, but we need your help! If you have community trees that are putting lives and property at risk and need help assessing tree risk, please contact us to find out more about the services of the Urban Forest Strike Team. Send an email to jscales@gfc.state.ga.us. Watch the video below to see our team at work!

Urban Forest Strike Team Video

Visit our website at www.gatrees.org for more information

 

 

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GI VIDEO

In this short video, discover the damaging effects of stormwater runoff and how you can help protect, preserve, and restore Coastal Georgia’s water quality and natural resources.

“Coastal Georgia’s Green Infrastructure & Stormwater Management,” can be viewed here https://vimeo.com/193902038

To learn more, visit:

Ecoscapes Sustainable Land Use Program, UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant

Georgia Forestry Commission

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Hello Georgia Tree Board Members and Urban Forestry Friends,

The Urban Update newsletter scfp-newsletter-february-2017 from the Sustainable Community Forestry Program, includes a list of recertified Tree City USAs and Tree Campus USAs for the 2016 year. Recertification materials have been shipped to our regional offices around the state.

Atlanta Arbor Day 1

City of Atlanta

Please join us for the Mayors’ Symposium on Trees and Statewide Arbor Day Celebration on February 14th at Trees Atlanta. Registration is free for mayors. We will highlight your campus or city’s 2016 Arbor Day successes, take photos of your tree board with State Forester Robert Farris, and prepare an individual news release for your city or campus. Your mayor can also have an opportunity to say a few words at the luncheon as well. Please call or email Susan (678-476-6227, sgranbery@gfc.state.ga.us) in advance to make arrangements regarding speaking or other announcements.

Arbor Day Proclamation 2016 Photo with Gov. Deal

Arbor Day Proclamation with Governor Deal 2016

If you are new to the Tree City USA program and would like to join a small group of us at the capitol on February 13th at 9:30 am, we will have a photo opportunity in the office of Governor Nathan Deal as he presents the official Georgia Arbor Day Proclamation. Please contact Susan Granbery if you are interested in joining us, along with your local legislators.

Happy Arbor Day!

Thank you,

The Georgia Forestry Commission, Sustainable Community Forestry Program

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Things really exploded across north Georgia this past weekend! Most of north Georgia is near, at, or just past peak, so this weekend should be an excellent time to tour north Georgia. Reds and yellows are still prominent, but the yellow golds of the hickories and the bronzing of the beeches and some of our oaks are creating many “golden” opportunities for color. Most species are fully engaged now with the exception of some oaks which will begin to show changes between now and Thanksgiving. The drought continues to make its presence known with increasing pockets of brown. With leaf fall now underway, these obvious signs will soon be lost.

We mentioned the drought again…. Wildfire occurrence in Georgia continues to escalate significantly and the forest fuels are reaching extremely low moisture levels, making control and mop up increasingly difficult. The Georgia Forestry Commission is asking the public to be extremely careful with any outdoor fire use and to be aware that mechanical equipment, cutting torches, grinders, grading equipment and anything capable of producing a spark or heat is a risk to start a wildfire. If you do see or know about a wildfire, call 911 immediately. These fires can spread quickly, so don’t try to put them out yourself but get to a safe place.

Northeast Georgia:

Leaf fall is fully underway and the higher elevations that were first to show color are the first to drop leaves. Expect to see many “leaf showers” thinning canopies as you travel the upper elevations. Good color can be found across the region, and as you move up and down in elevation you will have a chance to see the full spectrum of leaf color. Watch for the bright yellow golds of the hickories… especially in the early morning and late afternoon light.

Northwest Georgia:

The drought continues to hold northwest Georgia just a little tighter, and evidence of drought stress is increasing in many of the remaining canopies. However, the ever resilient forests continue to provide opportunities to appreciate the magic of fall. As in northeast Georgia, there is a bronzing effect going on with many of the oaks and beech trees. With some drought damage mixed in creating earthy brown patchworks, the still present bright reds, yellows and oranges provide some pretty contrast.

Peak is ongoing currently, and color should be around for the next 7-10 days. Winds forecast for Friday behind a cold from could bring down the rest of the canopy!

Virtually any drive through north Georgia will provide opportunity for color.

In northeast Georgia take a trip from Toccoa up GA 17 alt, then Old US 441 north to Clayton and on up to Dillard.

A little further west, head out of Cleveland on US 129 and then take a left on GA 9/US 19 at Turner’s Corner and travel back GA 60 and then left to Dahlonega.

Farther west, take GA 53 west out of Dawsonville, go right on GA 183, and then look for GA 136 west on your left and head over to Talking Rock and GA 515.

In northwest Georgia head west on GA 136 from Resaca and travel through Villanow and on to LaFayette.

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This week the color change rate has really picked up! While overall, canopies are still holding a lot of green in many places, roadside color and the understory trees are getting into the season. Peak is still a week to week and a half away, but with a nice weekend forecast, you can’t go wrong heading to north GA.

Northeast Georgia:

Color can be found at virtually every elevation this week though you will still see a lot of green in places.  The uppermost elevations (3500 feet and above) are at peak or past. The yellows are dominating the canopies right now, but the roadsides provide plenty of the reds and burgundies.

  • Species providing the red and burgundy hues this week continue to be the sourwoods, dogwoods, sumac, and black gum.
  • Birches, cherries, redbuds some maples and the yellow poplar are showing yellows and golds
  • Hickories have now joined the festivities with vibrant golds and yellows
  • The black walnut has also jumped in with lemony yellows.
  • Sweet gums continue to provide both yellows and purple reds
  • and the dependable maples continue to show yellows, reds, and oranges, and with many still in the initial stages of change they should continue to provide color for several weeks.
  • The sassafras has also joined in this week with yellows, reds, and orange.

Northwest Georgia:

Leaf change continues across northwest GA at most elevations with the upper elevations (2000 feet) showing the most consistent color. As in northeast GA you’ll find roadside color with the sourwoods and dogwoods but the dominant color in the canopies now is shades of yellow.

* The species continuing in the reds are the dogwoods, sourwoods, black gums, and sumacs

* with the yellow poplars, red buds, and black cherries showing yellows

* and the sweet gums providing both yellow and purplish reds.

* The hickories are beginning to display the golden yellows they’re known for.

Overall peak is still on schedule for the last weekend in October to the first week in November.

Elevations above 3500 feet are now at or just-past peak. Lower elevations are at 20-60% canopy change.

The continuing drought will have some impact but you can see excellent roadside color now throughout the region.

 Suggested scenic routes this weekend:

Travel GA 197 out of Clarkesville towards Lake Burton. At US 76 go either  west over Dicks Creek Gap to Hiawassee, or east to Clayton.

Take GA 52 out of Ellijay to the Fort Mountain State Park area.

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Here are some photos from the conference:

Do you take care of trees on a college or university campus? Don’t miss the

2016 GUFC College Canopy Conference, scheduled for September 14 (9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.) at Oxford College of Emory University in Oxford, Georgia. This historic college located at 110 Few Circle in Oxford, Georgia will host us as we hear talks on best management practices and campus management plans and choose from tours which include the Trees of the Oxford College Quad, Oxford’s famed Yarbrough Oak, and tree care on a construction project. This popular conference is a must for physical plant managers and crews, landscape directors, administrators, arborists, and others who are responsible for healthy campus urban forests.  Meet your peers from other educational institutions, share projects, and gain new urban forestry knowledge and ideas. $50 to register.  Lunch included.  5.5 ISA CEUs will be available.  See agenda here. Register here.

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Atlanta Canopy Conference Logo

“Trees Atlanta wants you to bring the arboretum home”

ATLANTA, GA, August 4, 2016 – Trees Atlanta will host its first annual Atlanta Canopy Conference on Friday, September 23, 2016 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Trees Atlanta Kendeda Center located at 225 Chester Avenue SE, Atlanta, GA 30316. The conference is for professionals, community leaders, and residents to take the lessons learned from the creation of the Atlanta BeltLine Arboretum and apply them to their own projects while protecting our urban canopy.

An arboretum is a botanical garden focused on woody plants, which are grown for research, education and display. The Atlanta BeltLine Arboretum is a collective effort of Trees Atlanta, the Atlanta BeltLine, and members of the surrounding community. The Arboretum will continue to develop as the Atlanta BeltLine itself continues to extend to a 22-mile corridor of trails, parks, trees, native grasses, wildflowers, art and so much more, while also attracting pollinators and wildlife.

“Our canopy is changing. Good design can both protect and improve our urban forest. Trees are becoming more critical to our communities as our cities rapidly develop and transform,” said Trees Atlanta’s Co-Executive Director, Greg Levine. “This conference will include experts who will address how arboreta can improve quality of life and demonstrate solutions for urban environmental challenges.”

The Atlanta Canopy Conference will feature a morning keynote by Darrel Morrison, FASLA, a pioneer in the use of native plants and natural processes in the design of urban landscapes. The afternoon session, Building the Arboretum: Past, Present, and the Future, includes a panel discussion with four registered landscape architects from The Portico Group, Perkins + Will, Hedstrom Design, and Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. who influence the design, implementation, and continued development of the Atlanta BeltLine Arboretum. The Atlanta Canopy Conference includes sessions on landscape design, arboreta collections, soil, tree diversity and availability, and actions attendees can take to apply the best practices from local arboreta to their green spaces.

Don’t miss your chance to hear presentations from noted horticulture experts and landscape professionals to help you bring the Arboretum home! Presenting organizations include: Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Bold Springs Nursery, Cox Arboretum, Ecological Landscape Management, Georgia Tech Arboretum, The Portico Group, Perkins + Will, Hedstrom Design, Atlanta BeltLine, Inc., The Conservation Fund, Georgia Conservancy, The Nature Conservancy, and Trees Atlanta.

Full, half-day and student registration is available. Full-day attendees will be eligible for CEU credits (ASLA, ISA), and will receive lunch, conference gift bag, and a discount to Tailgate for Trees. Complete conference information and registration is available at http://www.treesatlanta.org/canopyconference.

Media Contact:
Karla Vazquez
(404) 681-4891
karla@treesatlanta.org

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