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Posts Tagged ‘Georgia Forestry Commission’

Another storm crossed north Georgia this past week and left its mark, with many green leaves pulled off onto roads and yards. Some bruising and other damage has occurred, and temperatures have run in the mid and even upper 80’s in some locations. However, there is still a forest full of leaves that have just begun to change or that are just waiting to change.

Northeast Georgia:

Northeast Georgia is still mainly a canopy of green. However, we are definitely seeing change in individual trees and in groups of trees. And, depending on aspect (the direction the slope faces), elevation, and plant communities, we are seeing widespread change across some locations. Some of the best color right now is found on the roadsides and in areas with young growth and full sun.

Species that are currently showing color include the returning reds and burgundies of the sourwood, reds and some yellows of the maple and bright to golden yellows of the birch with the birch really coming on strong above about 2500 feet of elevation. We’re seeing more dogwoods with their reds and deep burgundies, sumac with some bright reds, and sumac showing yellows and orange-yellows. The yellow poplar, traditionally one of the early yellow color producers, is one of the trees that has seen early leaf loss, due in part to the storms, but you’ll still find it showing color in some areas.

Northwest Georgia:

Sourwood and maple continue to show color in the region that’s still showing lots of green. In addition, this week the northwest Georgia area is seeing cherry and yellow poplars starting to show some yellows, but again, a lot of foliage has been lost in the last two storms. Due to lower elevations in this area, we generally see about a week’s lag between the two regions, and next week or so should see increased change for the northwest.

Percentage of color change from green to date:  5%-40%

Peak should be the last week in October, into the first week of November.

Scenic drives:

Northeast Georgia – The yellows of the birch are really coming on along GA 180 between GA 17 and US 129. Take GA 180 to GA 180 Spur and travel up to Brasstown Bald, the highest point in GA.

Northwest Georgia – While it’s not vivid yet, a trip up towards Cloudland Canyon always provides a nice day.

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Dale's Grove

Georgia Forestry Commission retiree, Dale Higdon, has been named one of three finalists in the prestigious Cox Conserves Heroes awards program created by WSB-TV’s parent company, Cox Enterprises, and the Trust for Public land. The program honors volunteers like Dale, who lends his time and forestry expertise to to the Georgia Piedmont Land Trust, Mill Creek Nature Preserve, American Chestnut Foundation, Georgia Urban Forest Council, Walk in the Forest event with the Society of American Foresters Chattahoochee Chapter, and more.

Visit http://www.coxconservesheroes.com/atlanta/finalists.aspx​​ to view a video about Dale, his time with GFC and his genuine spirit of volunteerism that makes us proud to have had him as part of the GFC family.

Voting takes place in October and individuals are permitted to vote once. If Dale receives the most votes, The Georgia Piedmont Land Trust will receive a $10,000 award.

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This time last year we were trying to predict what the severe drought was going to do to our fall colors, and then we were watching mountain wildfires and thick layers of smoke. Mother Nature sent Irma this year and widespread, scattered tree damage was left in the form of uprooted trees and many downed limbs and tops. One additional factor that may have some impact on our color this year is the “bruising” of plant tissue; in some cases it may have resulted in the tearing or disruption of leaf stems and the death of leaves still on the trees, especially on the higher ridges and in some of the gaps. However, there are already signs of color change and Mother Nature rarely lets us down this time of year.

And in case you’re curious, the web-like structures/material you may see in some of our trees along the roads is the Fall Webworm. This caterpillar feeds on the foliage of many species and unfortunately, sourwood is among its favorites. This caterpillar will feed on the foliage and will often strip the tree of leaves. However, this time of year the leaves have completed their jobs, so the long term effects on the tree are minimal.

Continued cool nights and sunny days should provide us with the best chances for another great leaf season!

Northeast Georgia:

We are still likely a week out for significant color change in north Georgia. In the very highest elevations (Brasstown Bald), sourwood, which is one of our earliest turners, is starting to show some deep burgundies, though still mixed with green. Yellow birch is also showing its yellows in these upper slopes, as is sassafras which is starting with some yellows and orange.  Our maples are also just starting to show some deep reds, though color is limited and scattered.

Northwest Georgia:

As in Northeast Georgia, we’re still likely a week out for significant leaf color to begin. Some of the same species, including sourwood and maple, are beginning to show color, but again color is somewhat limited and scattered. 

Estimated percentage of color change from green to date:  5%

The weather is setting up for a good season with cooler nights and lots of sun. Continued similar weather should put us in good position for a great year.

Peak is a moving target, generally starting at the highest elevations and northern most latitudes and moving down in elevation and southerly in latitude and also influenced by aspect (direction of exposure) and species. Thus peak is different at different locations.

Overall peak, however, is generally around the last week and weekend in October. Given we may be a little late in starting this year, that window may stretch into early November.

This weekend is not likely to provide widespread leaf viewing but viewing the mountains any time of year is a treat.

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The Georgia Forestry Commission’s Sustainable Community Forestry Program is now using Constant Contact to reach Tree City USA and Tree Campus USA tree board members, legislators and partners. Check out the first issue of Community Tree News.

Community Tree News July 2017

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GI VIDEO

In this short video, discover the damaging effects of stormwater runoff and how you can help protect, preserve, and restore Coastal Georgia’s water quality and natural resources.

“Coastal Georgia’s Green Infrastructure & Stormwater Management,” can be viewed here https://vimeo.com/193902038

To learn more, visit:

Ecoscapes Sustainable Land Use Program, UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant

Georgia Forestry Commission

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Hello Georgia Tree Board Members and Urban Forestry Friends,

The Urban Update newsletter scfp-newsletter-february-2017 from the Sustainable Community Forestry Program, includes a list of recertified Tree City USAs and Tree Campus USAs for the 2016 year. Recertification materials have been shipped to our regional offices around the state.

Atlanta Arbor Day 1

City of Atlanta

Please join us for the Mayors’ Symposium on Trees and Statewide Arbor Day Celebration on February 14th at Trees Atlanta. Registration is free for mayors. We will highlight your campus or city’s 2016 Arbor Day successes, take photos of your tree board with State Forester Robert Farris, and prepare an individual news release for your city or campus. Your mayor can also have an opportunity to say a few words at the luncheon as well. Please call or email Susan (678-476-6227, sgranbery@gfc.state.ga.us) in advance to make arrangements regarding speaking or other announcements.

Arbor Day Proclamation 2016 Photo with Gov. Deal

Arbor Day Proclamation with Governor Deal 2016

If you are new to the Tree City USA program and would like to join a small group of us at the capitol on February 13th at 9:30 am, we will have a photo opportunity in the office of Governor Nathan Deal as he presents the official Georgia Arbor Day Proclamation. Please contact Susan Granbery if you are interested in joining us, along with your local legislators.

Happy Arbor Day!

Thank you,

The Georgia Forestry Commission, Sustainable Community Forestry Program

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Things really exploded across north Georgia this past weekend! Most of north Georgia is near, at, or just past peak, so this weekend should be an excellent time to tour north Georgia. Reds and yellows are still prominent, but the yellow golds of the hickories and the bronzing of the beeches and some of our oaks are creating many “golden” opportunities for color. Most species are fully engaged now with the exception of some oaks which will begin to show changes between now and Thanksgiving. The drought continues to make its presence known with increasing pockets of brown. With leaf fall now underway, these obvious signs will soon be lost.

We mentioned the drought again…. Wildfire occurrence in Georgia continues to escalate significantly and the forest fuels are reaching extremely low moisture levels, making control and mop up increasingly difficult. The Georgia Forestry Commission is asking the public to be extremely careful with any outdoor fire use and to be aware that mechanical equipment, cutting torches, grinders, grading equipment and anything capable of producing a spark or heat is a risk to start a wildfire. If you do see or know about a wildfire, call 911 immediately. These fires can spread quickly, so don’t try to put them out yourself but get to a safe place.

Northeast Georgia:

Leaf fall is fully underway and the higher elevations that were first to show color are the first to drop leaves. Expect to see many “leaf showers” thinning canopies as you travel the upper elevations. Good color can be found across the region, and as you move up and down in elevation you will have a chance to see the full spectrum of leaf color. Watch for the bright yellow golds of the hickories… especially in the early morning and late afternoon light.

Northwest Georgia:

The drought continues to hold northwest Georgia just a little tighter, and evidence of drought stress is increasing in many of the remaining canopies. However, the ever resilient forests continue to provide opportunities to appreciate the magic of fall. As in northeast Georgia, there is a bronzing effect going on with many of the oaks and beech trees. With some drought damage mixed in creating earthy brown patchworks, the still present bright reds, yellows and oranges provide some pretty contrast.

Peak is ongoing currently, and color should be around for the next 7-10 days. Winds forecast for Friday behind a cold from could bring down the rest of the canopy!

Virtually any drive through north Georgia will provide opportunity for color.

In northeast Georgia take a trip from Toccoa up GA 17 alt, then Old US 441 north to Clayton and on up to Dillard.

A little further west, head out of Cleveland on US 129 and then take a left on GA 9/US 19 at Turner’s Corner and travel back GA 60 and then left to Dahlonega.

Farther west, take GA 53 west out of Dawsonville, go right on GA 183, and then look for GA 136 west on your left and head over to Talking Rock and GA 515.

In northwest Georgia head west on GA 136 from Resaca and travel through Villanow and on to LaFayette.

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