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Archive for the ‘Arbor Day’ Category

Hello Georgia Tree Board Members and Urban Forestry Friends,

The Urban Update newsletter scfp-newsletter-february-2017 from the Sustainable Community Forestry Program, includes a list of recertified Tree City USAs and Tree Campus USAs for the 2016 year. Recertification materials have been shipped to our regional offices around the state.

Atlanta Arbor Day 1

City of Atlanta

Please join us for the Mayors’ Symposium on Trees and Statewide Arbor Day Celebration on February 14th at Trees Atlanta. Registration is free for mayors. We will highlight your campus or city’s 2016 Arbor Day successes, take photos of your tree board with State Forester Robert Farris, and prepare an individual news release for your city or campus. Your mayor can also have an opportunity to say a few words at the luncheon as well. Please call or email Susan (678-476-6227, sgranbery@gfc.state.ga.us) in advance to make arrangements regarding speaking or other announcements.

Arbor Day Proclamation 2016 Photo with Gov. Deal

Arbor Day Proclamation with Governor Deal 2016

If you are new to the Tree City USA program and would like to join a small group of us at the capitol on February 13th at 9:30 am, we will have a photo opportunity in the office of Governor Nathan Deal as he presents the official Georgia Arbor Day Proclamation. Please contact Susan Granbery if you are interested in joining us, along with your local legislators.

Happy Arbor Day!

Thank you,

The Georgia Forestry Commission, Sustainable Community Forestry Program

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TCUSA_logo_color_40thAnn

Tree City USA began in 1976 and is marking its 40th Anniversary this year. Tree City USA is sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters (Georgia Forestry Commission). This active partnership can be credited with the ongoing success of the program.

The Tree City USA program was designed to encourage better care of the nation’s community forests by awarding recognition to communities that meet four basic standards of a good tree care program. The Standards include:

Standard 1: A Tree Board or Tree Department

Standard 2: A Community Tree Ordinance

Standard 3: A Community Forestry Program with an Annual Budget of at least $2 per capita

Standard 4: An Arbor Day Observance and Proclamation

16 communities are celebrating 40 years of participation including Urbana, IL, Clay City, KS, Junction City, KS, Newton, KS, Auburn, NE. Paramus, NJ, Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, NJ, Grand Forks, ND, Mandan, ND, Springfield, OH, Westerville, OH, Wooster, OH, Salem, OR, Philadelphia, PA; and Upper Merion Township, PA.

More than 3,400 cities and towns take great pride in practicing sound urban forestry and being recognized as Tree City USA communities. Georgia’s oldest Tree City USA is Columbus, which celebrates its 38th year as a Tree City USA in 2016. The 10 oldest Tree City USAs in Georgia include:

City of Columbus – 38 Years

City of Avondale Estates – 32 Years

City of Marietta – 32 Years

City of Washington – 31 Years

City of Trenton – 31 Years

City of Savannah – 31 Years

City of Atlanta – 30 Years

City of Macon – 30 Years

City of Valdosta – 30 Years

City of Gainesville – 29 Years

Tree City USA increases public awareness of the many social, economic, and environmental benefits urban forests provide. Today, more than 137 million Americans make their homes in Tree City USA communities. They benefit daily from the cleaner air, shadier streets, and aesthetic beauty that healthy, well-managed urban forests provide.

If you do not live in a Tree City USA community, talk to your mayor or city council representative or state urban and community forestry agency. To learn more about the program, go to arborday.org or gatrees.org.

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We celebrated 2016 Georgia Arbor Day across the state in many different  ways.

The statewide Arbor Day event on February 17th at Trees Atlanta was a packed with more than 100 people, including 25 Tree City USAs, 4 Tree Campus USAs,  1 Tree Line USA and 4 mayors from Decatur, Dunwoody, Kennesaw and Mansfield. Director Robert Farris read the Arbor Day proclamation signed by Governor Nathan Deal and presented each community with a certificate and photo opportunity. News releases about the event were sent out locally on Georgia’s Arbor Day, officially declared as Friday, February 19th. Special guests for the “Mayors’ Symposium on Trees” were Danielle Crumrine and Josh Lippert from Tree Pittsburgh, Tim Keane, Walter Brown, Ryan Gravel and Decatur Mayor Patti Garrett.

More than 100 cities across the state celebrated in their own unique ways. The City of Avondale Estates planted a Ginkgo tree, specifically chosen by a homeowner for its beautiful fall color and unique characteristics (hopefully not female!). The City of Duluth planted two fruit trees at Bunten Road Park with the theme of hunger relief. The City of Rome held a seedling give-away and dedicated their new Heritage Trail Memorial Arboretum. All three mayors attended these local events.

Timmy Womick and the Tree Circus made appearances in Albany, Thomasville, Columbus, Warner Robins, Macon, Tifton and Oxford. At Agnes Scott College, honor trees were planted on campus in recognition of faculty and and staff, and Betty, a baker in the cafeteria, baked a delicious Arbor Day cake for the students.

“My Tree our Forest” Tree Tags were distributed to 40 communities to hang on the trees at city hall or other public spaces on Arbor Day. The tags help carry the message about the benefits of trees to citizens across the state.

“Hello down there!

  • I’m busy saving you money.
  • I’m busy making city life fun.
  • I’m busy making oxygen for you.
  • I’m busy making useful things for you.
  • I’m busy keeping your streets safe.
  • I’m keeping your drinking water clean.

What are you up to?”

We hope you were celebrating trees in your community too. Send us your pictures!

 

 

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By Tim Womick, TreeCircus

 

Russell Elementary in Warner Robbins where my first show of the day was prides themselves as “The Best School in the Universe.”  One of the reasons why they levy such a claim is their Junior Master Gardeners program. I’ve never heard of one before.

For over 35 years, volunteers have been participating in Master Gardeners (MG). The training is offered through the Georgia Cooperative Extension.  Their goal is to bring the latest horticultural information and practices from the world of research to local communities.  It’s working at Russell.

There needs to be more MG’s volunteering in our schools.  America’s future is our children.  Make a difference. Volunteer at your local school…they need you.  I salute Russell Elementary.

Later in the day I visited Macon’s Stratford Academy.  I love Macon for several reasons but at the top of the list would be their Yoshino Cherry trees.  Believe it or not, Macon has more cherry trees than Washington, DC!  During their annual International Cherry Blossom  Festival in March and begun in 1983, they sell 2,000 Yoshinos to the public (at $10 bucks a sapling…you do the math) that helps fund Keep Macon Bibb Beautiful.

All across Georgia, Keep America Beautiful affiliates work as the backbone of our statewide tree community.  But not only do they advocate for trees, they pick up a lot of litter (people who litter are trash) and coordinate recycling efforts too.

What is your city known for?  Take a hint from the fine folk in Macon and start your own tree festival. You’ll stimulate your economy, add to local beauty and contribute to a much needed healthy urban forest canopy.

Teach your children well.

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by Tim Womick, TreeCircus in Albany, GA at Lincoln Magnet School with Georgia Forestry Commission and Keep Albany-Dougherty Beautiful

Since 1941 Georgians have been officially celebrating their oldest, hardest-working residents.

If we had to pay for the services they provide we couldn’t afford them. 

Studies from Emory to Texas A & M to the University of Chicago tell us if we live in a healthy urban forest (the forest where we live) we will be healthier, happier and even live longer.

The first question I ask at the start one of my TreeCircus shows is, “Who likes trees?”  It’s rare that the entire audience doesn’t raise their hand.  

When I finish my show I ask “Who will make a difference in your community?” and it’s rare the entire audience doesn’t raise their hand.

Georgia Arbor Day 2016 is Friday, February 19. 

When you walk outside the front door of where you work, live and worship, take the time to look at the trees there.  Do you know what types they are? Are they vigorous or in decline? Any dead branches up there? (That’s what certified arborists are for.)

The time is now to give trees their due respect.

Today, take  our younger generation out for an Arbor Day Neighborhood Walk.  Scientific research shows you, your brain, and the rest of your body will feel better. Teach your children well.

#GAarborday

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Looking forward to our first Mayors’ Symposium on Trees and Statewide Arbor Day Celebration on Wednesday, February 17th at Trees Atlanta. The event is SOLD OUT and we have six mayors attending.

  • Mayor Patti Garrett, Decatur
  • Mayor Donna Pittman, Duluth
  • Mayor Denis Shortal, Dunwoody
  • Mayor Derek Easterling, Kennesaw
  • Mayor Robert Trammell, Luthersville
  • Mayor Jefferson Riley, Mansfield

Happy #GAarborday !

 

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URBAN UPDATE NEWSLETTER February 2016

The February issue of the Urban Update newsletter (click the link above) is full of information for tree board members, including a list of recertified Georgia Tree City USAs, information about the Mayor’s Symposium on Trees and Statewide Arbor Day Celebration on February 17th at Trees Atlanta,  A tree board webinar series, Arbor Day facts, food forests, a tree risk workshop in coastal Georgia, and more!

Happy Arbor Day!

Tree Team

Berry College Tree Team

From the Georgia Forestry Commission, Sustainable Community Forestry Program

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